Virtrium

Business Value from IT

Business Value from IT

Architecture translates the strategy into specific architectural requirements. Like strategy, architecture typically has a number of components:

  • The Application Architecture defines how applications will be developed, supported and managed
  • The Information Architecture establishes a common approach for information sharing and storage
  • The Technical Architecture cost effectively delivers the underlying infrastructure to meet the needs of the Application and Information Architectures.

The target operating model describes the desired state of the operations of the business and connects operational processes and people to the IT Strategy.

Driven by the governance strategy, the design of the IT governance model is closely linked to the organisational structure and shaped by the operating model.

Our experience, engaging approach and model documents help you to develop the right architecture, operating model and governance and to build the necessary commitment to them.

Please click on the links to see our IT Architecture case studies:

Talk Talk, Macmillan, Mitchells & Butlers

Architecture Design

  • Architecture translates the strategy into specific structural requirements. As with the IT Strategy it can be helpful to think of Architecture as having a number of components. Working closely with you, we help you to decide which components will be needed and to develop and document them.
  • The Application Architecture addresses the question: “Which applications do we need to deliver our business goals?” It defines how applications will be integrated, transitioned from the current state to the required future state, and supported and managed through their lifecycles. It is driven by business requirements which can be defined using business process mapping and active involvement from relevant employees and managers.
  • Information Architecture establishes a common approach for information sharing and storage. It examines the sensitivity of the business to loss of information. It is driven by business requirements and analysis of financial and/or reputational damage resulting from a loss of information. The Information Architecture can be developed through either a top-down approach, examining the business processes, the data stores and retention policies; or bottom-up, using the our Application Profiling Tool. The output is used to help define a Technical Architecture that reduces duplication, drives commonality and reduces risk.
  • Built from the Applications and Information Architectural requirements, the Technical Architecture is designed to cost effectively deliver the underlying infrastructure and platforms to meet these needs. The Technical Architecture utilises both a Recoverability, Availability, Maintainability and Protection (RAMP) and Tolerate, Invest, Migrate and Eliminate (TIME) assessment to determine the trajectory of architectural change. It also takes into account the preferred funding and operational models of the business.

Target Operating Model Design

  • The Target Operating Model (TOM) describes the desired state of the operations of the business. Together with the Governance Model, the TOM holds all the rest together. By themselves, IT Strategies may not be immediately actionable – people don’t necessarily know what they are supposed to do to make them happen. The TOM addresses this by connecting operational processes and people to the IT Strategy. The TOM sets out terms of reference, monitoring and reporting requirements. It also covers roles and responsibilities, procurement and vendor management, service management and delivery.
  • Together with the Governance Model, the Operating Model ultimately explains the workings of the IT function both in terms of how it is organised and what it will do. It allows for the implementation of best-practice processes as defined in the IT Strategy.
  • When we deliver a Target Operating Model, we typically also provide the roadmap to specify what the company needs to do to move from the “as is” to the “to be” state.
  • It is critically important to gain the commitment of a large number of stakeholders to a new TOM. This can be done by combining the design of the TOM with review and iteration in a suitable workshop programme, and adhering to principles such as simplicity, ease of operation, transparency, cultural fit and match to overall organisational structure. We can guide you through the most effective way to do this in your business.

Governance Model Design

  • The unrelenting pace of change in both technology and the world at large means that today, effective governance of information technology is essential to the success of any organisation. CObIT, a widely recognised standard for IT Governance, defines Governance through three capabilities for the use of Information Technology: Monitoring, Evaluation and Direction.
  • Driven by the Governance Strategy, the design of the IT Governance Model for any organisation is closely linked to the organisational structure. So the TOM influences the shape and requirements of the governance model.
  • The IT Governance Model also needs to reflect your business’ strategic goals, business plan and priorities, and to fit with its Corporate Governance Model.
  • We work with you to design an IT Governance Model that fits these requirements, and is easy to understand, communicate and implement.